Net Lease Properties & Triple Net Leased Commercial PROPERTY

This Hamilton County Retail Property is Off-Market. E mail us for similar Commercial Properties Accessible in Florida. 10, making shopping fun without extending the grouped family budget. JENNINGS is a town in Hamilton County, Florida, conveniently located significantly less than half an hour from Valdosta, Georgia and only about an full hour and a half from Jacksonville, Gainesville and Tallahassee.

Orlando, Daytona, St. Tampa and Augustine are under a three hour drive away. Unlike the stereotypical Florida, Hamilton County is full of green pastures, cornfields, horse farms and two lane roads. Listing information thanks to Calkain Companies, a commercial real estate company. All listing information is regarded as reliable but not guaranteed and really should be independently confirmed through personal inspection by appropriate specialists. Listings displayed on this website may be subject to prior removal or sale from sale. Availability of any listing should be individually confirmed. Listing information is provided for consumer personal, solely to identify potential properties for potential purchase.

I have a small accounts of dividend-paying stocks and shares. We recently inherited an IRA and we had a need to roll it over into Mark’s accounts as an IRA to avoid fees. So, this has to be handled just so, to avoid paying a huge chunk in taxes. You know, the sort of thing you want your investment adviser to help you with.

The Fidelity agent who handled the deceased’s IRA told use to set up a new accounts and to go online to get this done. I was just a little worried as I didn’t want yet another accounts separate from the initial accounts. Mark wished our “adviser” in Florida to handle it. No returned call, no e-mail, nothing at all.

In truth, it is hard to get in touch with people there, straight. E-mails go through a central clearing house, and phone calls require a five-digit expansion that is routed to tone of voice mail. So I called and remaining a message. I still left and e-mailed a message. I gave account numbers, the telephone number of the person handling the deceased’s account. Nothing. No return calls, no guidance, no coordination. So what’s the point?

I finally called the guy in Maine managing the deceased’s accounts and after a couple weeks, he called back. We were able to create the account, which so has a balance of zero considerably. We’ll find out if the proceeds transfer or not. The next thing was that we had sold a house in Florida and today got a six-figure amount to spend money on Fidelity. I needed to ask our “adviser” where we have to make investments this money. Again, phone calls, e-mails, and no response.

But meanwhile, the junk mail continues to stream in, peppered with credit-card offers now. Do these people have my back again really? And what on God’s earth is certainly going on here? I log onto their website, which is OK, but like the majority of financial websites, obsesses about stock price and neglects income and dividends. At least on eTrade I could get a printout of my dividend and interest income and a forecast of income for another year.

On Fidelity, to see my interest and dividend income, I must either download monthly “statements” (within an unreadable and complicated format) or just look at the cash balance in my own account and think where the money came from. But as bad as that site was, Fidelity chooses to come up with a “New Exciting Website Experience!” – with a variety of flashy images and nonsense that i am sure packed really quickly on the developer’s computer. Sadly, on mine, it crashes, even using a UVERSE connection. On the laptop at an Internet Cafe? Well just forget about it. And this new website, now in Beta, will be shoved down our throats this spring.

  • ► June 2010 (5)
  • How is the worthiness of goodwill derived
  • What was the most difficult decision you ever had to make
  • Assets in leasing will be treated as resources transporting 100% risk weightage
  • 4 Understand your existing collection first

And if which were the case, I would be cheering it on. Investment houses derive from trust. You hand them the fruits of decades of hard labor, plus they hand you bedding of paper with numbers in it, that say you have a lot money. Banks work the same way. And that is why both make an effort to use titles which sound strong and trustworthy (say, for example, Fidelity).

No one titles their brokerage “Joe’s Fly-by-Night”. And it is why banking institutions have vault-like structures that give the impression of basic safety and permanence. And yea, a complete lot of the is illusory, as we ago discovered about six years. Banks and brokerage houses can fly away with the wind on a moment’s notice.

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